The World of Null-A



The Classic Novel Of Non Aristotelian Logic And The Coming Race Of SupermenScience Fiction Grandmaster A E Van Vogt Was One Of The Giants Of The 1940s, The Golden Age Of Classic SF Of His Masterpieces, The World Of Null A Is His Most Famous And Most Influential Published In 1949 It Was The First Major Trade SF Hardcover, And Has Been In Print In Various Editions Ever Since The Entire Careers Of Philip K Dick, Keith Laumer, Alfred Bester, Charles Harness, And Philip Jose Farmer Were Created Or Influenced By The World Of Null A, And So It Is Required Reading For Anyone Who Wishes To Know The Canon Of SF Classics.It Is The Year 2650 And Earth Has Become A World Of Non Aristotelianism, Or Null A This Is The Story Of Gilbert Gosseyn, Who Lives In That Future World Where The Games Machine, Made Up Of Twenty Five Thousand Electronic Brains, Sets The Course Of People S Lives Gosseyn Isn T Even Sure Of His Own Identity, But Realizes He Has Some Remarkable Abilities And Sets Out To Use Them To Discover Who Has Made Him A Pawn In An Interstellar Plot.The World of Null-A

Alfred Elton van Vogt was a Canadian born science fiction author regarded by some as one of the most popular and complex science fiction writers of the mid twentieth century the Golden Age of the genre.van Vogt was born to Russian Mennonite family Until he was four years old, van Vogt and his family spoke only a dialect of Low German in the home He began his writing career with true story ro

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  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 173 pages
  • The World of Null-A
  • A.E. van Vogt
  • Portuguese
  • 03 February 2017

10 thoughts on “The World of Null-A

  1. says:

    Pardon me for asking, but aren t we ALL in this happy clan of GR omni readers becoming little Null A Pioneers For like Gilbert Gosseyn no matter how he slices and dices this big old Multiverse we now call home the whole thing just keeps getting, as Alice said deep down in the rabbit hole Curiouser and curiouser I know, I didn t finish the book But does that disqualify me You see, living mostly in the twentieth century, I wanted to resign from the Whole Rat Race when I retired at the beginning of this twenty first It was all just getting too fast and crazy for little old slowpoke me I felt just like poor Gilbert But now even THAT s getting curiouser and curiouser, because now in my seventies I find if I stop for plenty of pit stops, I can Eventually complete the current lap.Whew gasp, gasp Dead last of course, but The End s in Sight So now, it s curiousest of allBecause if old Gil can get promoted at the midpoint of the book to the Ruling Party of the Universe maybe there s some little hope in it all for me dream on, old codger So, when this book begins, Planet Earth is...

  2. says:

    An extremely strange occurrence Many years ago, when I was in my early teens, I read A.E van Vogt s World of Null A, which is about as good as most of A.E van Vogt s oeuvre that is to say, not very good at all I was however struck by his preface, where he boasted that this novel, all by itself, had or less established the French SF market Even at age 14, I was puzzled Why Much later, I discovered that van Vogt s unimpressive book had in fact been translated by Boris Vian, author of the immortal L Ecume des Jours, and a friend of Jean Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir Perhaps some Vian scholar has found out why he did it money trouble and if so I would be interested to hear the story Whatever the explanation, this is one of those very rare occurrences where the translation is better than the original the writing is perfectly OK, and even goodish in places Since the original plot was in fact quite interesting A.E van Vogt always had ideas, he just couldn t write them down , the final result is a decent piece of work, and my 35 year old curiosity about how this could have been such a success was finally ...

  3. says:

    4.0 stars One of the better novels by A E Van Vogt and certainly one of his most famous Big ideas, cool concepts and a fast paced plot Above average science fiction from the Golden Age Nominee Retro Hugo Award for Best Science Fiction novel.

  4. says:

    I ve read this three times now Every time I do, it feels like I m reading it for the first time So weird, yet I really like it It is such a strange book like reading a standard classic from a parallel universe Is this what a great novel is like in your world In mine it s all wrong sloppy disjointed, illogical, but if you put yourself in that other world van s world , it is a master piece of scifi literature.It is inspired by the pseudoscience work Science and Sanity An Introduction to Non Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics 1933 by Alfred Korzybski of the theory of General Semantics Vogt does not bog the story down on theory, but rather merely uses the system as a vehicle to anchor his story to, the same way PKD used Game Theory for his 1955 novel Solar Lottery.I love thi...

  5. says:

    Science fiction writer A E van Vogt liked big ideas In the 1950 s he became head of fellow sf writer L Ron Hubbard s Dianetics Institute, the secular precursor to the Church of Scientology When Hubbard s institute failed within a year, van Vogt and his wife formed their own institute and kept it going for the entire decade.Earlier, the big idea that captivated van Vogt was the Gerneral Semantics program of the Polish count Alfred Korzybski, a program defined in the count s 800 page self published book Science and Sanity An Introduction to Non Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics. 1933 This was a grand system intended to make people think clearly, reach better decisions, and create a better world Much of General Semantics seems like common sense, but the insistence on its science is shaky and always prompted as many detractors as followers Van Vogt was enthusiastically among the latter Martin Gardner is among those who dismiss the enterprise as pseudo science, but there is a still an Institute of General Semantics in Chicago Of course there is also an International Center of Theosophy, and London is home to the Swedenborg Foundation Sorry to sound dismissive but I am.True Believer van Vogt used Kozybski s ideas as the underlying philosophy of his breakthrough nove...

  6. says:

    An extremely strange occurrence Many years ago, when I was in my early teens, I read A.E van Vogt s World of Null A, which is about as good as most of A.E van Vogt s oeuvre that is to say, not very good at all I was however struck by his preface, where he boasted that this novel, all by itself, had or less established the French SF market Even at age 14, I was puzzled Why Much later, I discovered that van Vogt s unimpressive book had in fact been translated by Boris Vian, author of the immortal L Ecume des Jours, and a friend of Jean Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir Perhaps some Vian scholar has found out why he did it money trouble and if so I would be interested to hear the story Whatever the explanation, this is one of those very rare occurrences where the translation is better than the original the writing is perfectly OK, and even goodish in places Since the original plot was in fact quite interesting A.E van Vogt always had ideas, he just couldn t write them down , the final result is a decent piece of work, and my 35 year old curiosity about how...

  7. says:

    This novel, written in 1945, shows its age This goes beyond imagining Venus as a damp forest of huge trees, or that people in the year 2650 will still be placing personal ads in paper newspapers The world itself is smaller, pretty much all white men, in a conformist society The science itself, such as what can be done with atomic power or plastics, gets stretched beyond all possibility.Still, A.E van Vogt is famous for ideas, and he has one that powers this novel What if a highly rational non Aristotelian philosophy guided the behavior of the best men and women of their time Unfortunately, van Vogt doesn t explain this philosophy in great depth It seems to compel the protagonist to act without a lot of forethought or long term goals.Van Voght has ideas a computer game that decides the participants futures, a legal holiday during which no laws are enforced, a minor kind of immortality, a huge galactic war that aims to conquer Venus and Earth.The plot involves a man trying to find out who he is Eventually he finds out In the process a lot of people die.This book is considered a classic, possibly one of van Vogt s best, and it s worth reading if only to watch ideas whiz past like scenery...

  8. says:

    The World of Null A is a mixed bag All too frequently I found myself having to stop and re read sections to figure out basic plot points and this was generally because of a basic lack of clarity in key scenes, not because of a particularly advanced concept and found it difficult to integrate the two major drives of the book, one toward political thriller regarding interplanetary and galactic war and one toward speculation about human and social evolution These two drives are definitely related through the basic plot, but they do not feel related it is a major shift to go from one element of the novel to the other as one is focused on the protagonist, Gosseyn, and his attempts to discover who he is and to survive the warfare and politicking going on around him, and the other deals with the larger picture of null A society based on non Aristotelian, non Newtonian, and non Euclidian logic , Venus and its null A inhabitants, and the politics of the galactic community This is really a shame, too, because the novel does contain some interesting speculation about the future evolution of the human species as well as human society not to mention some fast paced adventure sequences which make it great fun to read at times Van Vogt...

  9. says:

    Continuing this year in my exploration of classic SF I thought I would take a look at a famous novel by van Vogt It turns out that van Vogt was a Canadian from a Mennonite community in Manitoba He was an amazingly prolific author who moved to LA right after the war There he became quite interested in the concepts of General Semantics or non Aristotelian logic Null A I m no logician but from what I understand Aristotelian logic assumes binary states for a statement e.g The dog is a collie Null A logic assumes there are three or values for every statement This can all get highly semantic and we are here to review a book sovan Vogt popularized these concepts in a series of Null A books of which The World of Null A was the first In the year 2650 humans live in a vast and comforting utopian society Individuals train to think in a non Aristotelian pattern so that they may compete in the Game which is run by an immense machine Those that succeed will advance to higher positions in life and the best will be allowed to go live on Venus where all is idyllic The hero, Gilbert Gosseyn pronounce it go sane , appears to be a man trying to follow this path He attempts to enter the Game but finds himself caught up in a vast conspiracy where his identity is suspect and where ultimately he may hold the balance of power for the entire universe.The novel is complex but entirely readable Even though the book is from the 1940 s there are some really compelling SF situations ...

  10. says:

    The book brings back to me the 1950s Names like Eldred Crang and Hari Seldon this from Isaac Asimov s Foundation series , Intergalactic wars Highly advanced devices with tubes like an old Emerson TV set Planets in our solar system that could sustain life Take, for instance, this description of Venus Gosseyn said, Doctor, what is Venus like the cities, I mean The doctor rolled his head sideways to look at Gosseyn, but did not move his body Oh, much like earth cities, but suited to the perpetually mild climate Because of the high clouds, it never gets too hot And it never rains except in the mountains But every night on the great verdant plains, there s a heavy dew And UI mean heavy enough to look after all the luxuriant growth One of the side effects of space exploration is the death of dreams of life on the Moon, on Mars, and on Venus As a teeneager, I loved A E Van Vogt, and I loved novels like The World of Null A, Slan, The Empi...

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